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Tagged with art

Decant Day, 9 November 2016: Packing up the Cottonian Collection

By Susan Leedham, Cottonian Collection Researcher As we near the halfway point of Decant (ready for building work to start in the New Year) it was time to move one of our most important pieces – our nationally designated Cottonian Collection. The Cottonian Collection was gifted to the people of Plymouth in 1853 for our […]

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Reynolds: Dock, Devon and London

The following post is based on an Art Bite talk given at the Plymouth City Museum & Art Gallery. It was given by Lawrie Thorne, who has carried out research into Reynolds’ early years up until the 1750s. We pick up the story in Plymouth, as Reynolds is establishing himself as a portrait painter. As […]

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Reynolds’ early years in Plympton

By Lawrie Thorne – project volunteer Lawrie has carried out research into Reynolds’ early years up until the 1750s. This is the first in a series of posts looking at the significance of the recently acquired self-portrait, in the life and times of Reynolds. It is based on an Art Bite talk given in December 2014. Joshua Reynolds was born on […]

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The early times of Reynolds at Plymouth Dock

By Celia Bean, project volunteer Before he was 20 Joshua Reynolds had declared that if he did not prove himself to be the best painter of the age by the time he reached 30 he never would.  So we can assume that when he returned to Plympton St Maurice in 1743 after prematurely finishing his […]

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Sir Joshua’s family tree

By Nicci Wakeham, project volunteer Having seen the call for volunteer community researchers into the life and times of Sir Joshua Reynolds, with Plymouth City Museum and Art Gallery, I was eager to become involved. This would involve research using books, journals, the resources of the Plymouth & West Devon Record Office, information held at […]

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Tracing Reynolds’ Italian inspirations part 2

By Paul Willis, Curator of Fine Art Here are more works I have managed to identify from our Reynolds sketchbook. The set of sketches recto 62 and recto 63 are of the Parmigianino (1503–1540) work: Cupid, 1523-4 oil on wood, 135cm x 65.3cm. The theme of this painting may be based on a concept of late antiquity […]

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Tracing Reynolds’ Italian inspirations

By Paul Willis, Curator of Fine Art I would like to share a few of the works I have managed to identify from our Reynolds sketchbook. The first sketch (recto 10) is of the Giovanni Lanfranco (1582 – 1647) painting: The Liberation of Saint Peter, c. 1620-1, oil on canvas, 154cm x 122.1cm. In this unfinished […]

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Tea at the Cottonian a Success!

What a success our first event of Young Explainers 2013 has been! On Friday the 11th of October we hosted an event at the Museum named ‘Tea at the Cottonian’; there were special guests including the Lord Mayor of Plymouth, Vivien Pengelley, Peter Smith, the deputy leader of Plymouth City Council as well as Monika […]

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Reynolds, London and the Hudson connection

Laurie Thorne continues to look at Reynolds’ early life. Previously we learned that Reynolds’ wish was to train with a renowned artist, and Lawrie now looks at Reynolds’ life after he moves to London. In October 1740 aged 17 years he arrived in London to begin a four year training in the studio of the […]

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