Feedback

Tagged with art

Sir Joshua’s family tree

By Nicci Wakeham, project volunteer Having seen the call for volunteer community researchers into the life and times of Sir Joshua Reynolds, with Plymouth City Museum and Art Gallery, I was eager to become involved. This would involve research using books, journals, the resources of the Plymouth & West Devon Record Office, information held at […]

Read more

Tracing Reynolds’ Italian inspirations part 2

By Paul Willis, Curator of Fine Art Here are more works I have managed to identify from our Reynolds sketchbook. The set of sketches recto 62 and recto 63 are of the Parmigianino (1503–1540) work: Cupid, 1523-4 oil on wood, 135cm x 65.3cm. The theme of this painting may be based on a concept of late antiquity […]

Read more

Tracing Reynolds’ Italian inspirations

By Paul Willis, Curator of Fine Art I would like to share a few of the works I have managed to identify from our Reynolds sketchbook. The first sketch (recto 10) is of the Giovanni Lanfranco (1582 – 1647) painting: The Liberation of Saint Peter, c. 1620-1, oil on canvas, 154cm x 122.1cm. In this unfinished […]

Read more

Tea at the Cottonian a Success!

What a success our first event of Young Explainers 2013 has been! On Friday the 11th of October we hosted an event at the Museum named ‘Tea at the Cottonian’; there were special guests including the Lord Mayor of Plymouth, Vivien Pengelley, Peter Smith, the deputy leader of Plymouth City Council as well as Monika […]

Read more

Reynolds, London and the Hudson connection

Laurie Thorne continues to look at Reynolds’ early life. Previously we learned that Reynolds’ wish was to train with a renowned artist, and Lawrie now looks at Reynolds’ life after he moves to London. In October 1740 aged 17 years he arrived in London to begin a four year training in the studio of the […]

Read more

The Plaque is Back!

by Emma Philip, curator of Fine Art One of the 10 items conserved as part of this project is our rosewood occasional table made around 1825. We haven’t yet got to the bottom of how it entered the Cottonian Collection, but its date would suggest that it was one of William Cotton III’s purchases, perhaps […]

Read more

We have finally done it!

After weeks of hard work by all members of the Young Explainer’s Gallery Interpretation team, the new Cottonian Adult’s Guide is in its final stages and nearing completion. Over the last couple of months we have all been busy researching into different aspects of the collection, whether that has been looking into the individual stories […]

Read more

The Big One’s Little Mystery

By Emma Philip, curator of Fine Art Following on from my last post, once we’d finally managed to clear all 300+ books out of the largest bookcase, Allan and Chris from Tankerdale set about dismantling it into its 16 sections; eight glazed top units and eight low cabinets with veneered doors. When they got to […]

Read more

All Change Please…

By Emma Philip, curator of Fine Art On Monday 29th July we began work on the biggest changeover of furniture yet in the Cottonian Gallery.  The biggest bookcase in the collection, wittily christened as ‘The Big One’ to those of us on the project team, was off to conservation at Tankerdale. ‘The Big One’ contains […]

Read more

Designing the Cottonian

As one part of the design team working with the Young Explainers project this year it’s exciting to share a bit of what we have been working away on. We started with the word ‘Unweaving’ and this idea of unraveling the history of the Cottonian Collection. We, the design team, are a couple of students […]

Read more